Professor Gage Averill Appointed VicePrincipal and Dean University of Toronto at Mississauga

PDAD&C #13, 2007-08

Memorandum

TO:         Faculty, Staff and Students, Faculty of Music
              Faculty, Staff and Students, University of Toronto Mississauga
              PDAD&C

FROM:     Ian Orchard, Vice-President and Principal
               Vivek Goel, Vice-President and Provost

DATE:     September 18, 2007

RE:         Professor Gage Averill Appointed Vice-Principal and Dean, 
                
University of Toronto at Mississauga

______________________________________________________________________________

We announce the appointment of Professor Gage Averill as Vice-Principal and Dean, University of Toronto at Mississauga effective October 15, 2007.

Professor Averill, a world-renowned ethnomusicologist, was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto in 2004. Prior to that, he held academic positions at Wesleyan University and New York University. He was also a visiting professor at Columbia and Princeton Universities. Dean Averill has been a champion of multicultural music education, community outreach and student-focused planning. At the Faculty of Music, he has been instrumental in doubling the size of graduate student enrolment, creating a new doctorate in performance and forming interdisciplinary collaborations. On a university-wide level, he has made major contributions to groups such as the U of T Arts Council and has worked closely with his decanal colleagues, earning the confidence and cooperation of faculty, staff and students.

Author of numerous articles and books, his most recent publications have been on issues of music, peace and violence in the wake of 9/11, the role of world music ensembles in teaching ethnomusicology, as well as educational policy, including applied ethnomusicology and the role of public intellectuals. His research focuses on the ideological context of music production with special attention to the role that music and expressive culture play in social transformation. His major projects have explored Haitian popular music and power, North American barbershop harmony and questions of race and nostalgia, globalizing culture industries and Trinidadian steel bands. He is currently working on a 10-CD volume of rare Haitian music recorded in the 1930s. He also continues to work in forensic musicology as a consultant on copyright cases in music.

Dean Averill has had a transformative impact on the Faculty of Music. While we are sorry to lose him as Dean of Music, it is wonderful that he will continue to contribute to the senior leadership of the university in his new role at UTM. Professor Averill’s integrative approach to education and his collaborative partnerships will be a significant benefit to the UTM community.

Professor Averill will be stepping down as Dean of the Faculty effective October 14, 2007. On behalf of all his colleagues at the University of Toronto we thank him for his contributions to the Faculty of Music and wish him well in this new challenge.